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Instruction

Instruction

Even a momentary lapse of focus on the golf course can lead to trouble. Photo: John Whinery / PDGA Media

By Dane Anderson

On the course there are many distractions that can interfere with a disc golfer’s ability to focus on the shot at hand. Whether it’s chatter from other players, the direction and speed of the wind, or thoughts about the next hole, opportunities to lose concentration right before a shot abound. Our minds synthesize countless pieces of information through the five senses at such a rapid pace, no wonder focusing can be so difficult. Add to these distractions the pressure of an important shot that could put you in the lead, and you have a recipe for potential disaster.

Dealing with a toxic cardmate can be a big distraction if you let it. Photo: PDGA Media / Alyssa Van Lanen

The short answer is, you must accept that you are competing in a sport and you don’t get to handpick who you get to spend all of your time with. Sometimes your competition is not somebody who you would want to go to lunch with afterwards or who you would want to marry your firstborn. That’s just the way it is.

Get your mind right, and the rest of your game will follow. Photo: Alyssa Van Lanen / PDGA Media

Disc golf is, at its core, a mental game. No matter how fit you are physically or how far you can throw the disc, your mindset plays a major role in determining how well you will perform.

And when it comes time for your first tournament, your mental game is tested on a whole new level. New nerves, new stress, and, of course, new ways to screw up. This can all take a toll and can lead to a pretty poor performance in your first tournament.

Improve your first PDGA tournament exprience by avoiding these five common mistakes. Photo: PDGA Tour

Everyone makes mistakes, especially as they are learning a new craft. But for those who want shorten the learning curve when making the transition to sanctioned tournament play, it will be useful to understand some of the most common mistakes made by beginners entering their first PDGA event.

1. Playing in the wrong division.

Seth Munsey (back) helps Eagle McMahon prepare before a tournament. Courtesy photo

By J. Branden Garland, DC, CCSP and Seth Munsey, CSCS

We find ourselves in an unprecedented time. For many of us, this has been the longest stretch of time without disc golf in memory. We are used to playing with friends, taking part in regular league play, tournaments, and other forms of competitive disc golf. We depend on this not only for activity, but also as a social outlet.

Without disc golf, we all feel a gap in our lives. That said, there are things we can be doing to maximize our athletic potential on the course when things open up.

Madison Walker has battled a string of injuries but has used visualization and breathing strategies to come back stronger. Photo: Alyssa Van Lanen

The COVID-19 pandemic has upended life for many, forcing millions on stay-at-home orders to stop the spread of the novel coronavirus. And while it pales in comparison to the loss of life, staggering unemployment numbers, and broken social ties, disc golfers are still feeling the impact.

Simon Lizotte gives his tips for breaking down your driving form, including when to grab the right freeze frames. Photo: Alyssa Van Lanen

The COVID-19 pandemic has upended life for many, forcing millions of people on stay-at-home orders to stop the spread of this novel coronavirus. And while it pales in comparison to the loss of life, staggering unemployment numbers, and broken social ties, disc golfers are still feeling the impact.

A.J. Risley offers his intentional putting practice as a strategy disc golfers can employ away from the course. Photo: Eino Ansio

The COVID-19 pandemic has upended life for many, forcing millions of people on stay-at-home orders to stop the spread of this novel coronavirus. And while it pales in comparison to the loss of life, staggering unemployment numbers, and broken social ties, disc golfers are still feeling the impact.