MikeMC
Apr 24 2007, 10:34 AM
I've been having trouble with accuracy when I'm driving from a tee box that has a significant (35 - 45 degree) uphill grade. I'm a rhbh and use a 5 step cross step. I am consistantly going left of the fairway because I have trouble getting around on my pivot foot when going uphill. What adjustments to your technique do you do when the tee box is not level but requires you to go uphill during the drive?

Thanks!

discette
Apr 24 2007, 10:39 AM
Uphill tee pads SUCK!!!!

Course designers and installers should NEVER put in permanent tee pads that slant uphill or downhill.

I wish I had better advice for you.

Sharky
Apr 24 2007, 10:57 AM
In general on any uphill shot lighter more understable discs help as does slowing down your runnup a bit.

the_beastmaster
Apr 24 2007, 11:44 AM
I've been having trouble with accuracy when I'm driving from a tee box that has a significant (35 - 45 degree) uphill grade. I'm a rhbh and use a 5 step cross step. I am consistantly going left of the fairway because I have trouble getting around on my pivot foot when going uphill. What adjustments to your technique do you do when the tee box is not level but requires you to go uphill during the drive?

Thanks!



My first suggestion would be: don't play at Sedgley. /msgboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif :D

But, I usually will take a 2 or 3 step walk up, or just stand and throw. I'll also use something a bit less stable. For me, the key is adjusting my runup before I throw, and then not thinking about it being uphill during my throw. If I'm in my backswing thinking "I hate uphill tees," then I usually will screw up the throw even more.

DSproAVIAR
Apr 24 2007, 12:13 PM
This works better when in the fairway, not on the tee, but it may be useful for certain tee shots as well.

Instead of lining up directly behind your disc, line up 1-2 steps backward and 4-5 steps to the right. Run up (slowly) perpendicular to the line you want to throw on. When you reach your lie, your shoulders will be turned back much more. Your back will most likely be pointing at the target. I lose some accuracy when I do this, but hardly any power. It may feel awkward, but practice makes perfect.

abee1010
Apr 24 2007, 12:20 PM
Slowing down your runnup is the key when dealing with an uphill teepad or lie. If you are also shooting uphill then you would be wise to throw lest stable plastic since you will inherently be throwing 'nose up.'

I also change my motion to my 'sky anhyzer' style rather than my typical 'flat' style to get more distance and a better angle on uphill throws...

denny1210
Apr 24 2007, 12:39 PM
I've been having trouble with accuracy when I'm driving from a tee box that has a significant (35 - 45 degree) uphill grade.


I have trouble not falling down on a 35-45 degree grade.

There's some good advice here, I'd add: throw sidearm.

rhett
Apr 24 2007, 01:48 PM
I am consistantly going left of the fairway because I have trouble getting around on my pivot foot when going uphill.


Having never watched you drive, I would guess that you are going left mostly because that's what happens when you throw a disc high at a steep angle with the nose up.

Lot's of good advice so far here.

Throw understable plastic since you have to throw with the nose up.

Slow down your runup.

I played at Yucaipa last weekend and there were a couple of uphill tee pads leading to extremely uphill shots. I noticed that we all tried to run-up and then basically stopped on the last step and threw, so we could have just used a "stand a deliver" drive and saved ourselves the possibility of falling down!

I threw beat to heck 167g DX Leopard (my flippy roller disc) on an air-shot on one of the holes and that worked pretty well.

abee1010
Apr 24 2007, 03:20 PM
Come to DGLO this year and you can learn all about uphill runups on the TOBOGGAN COURSE!!!

DSproAVIAR
Apr 24 2007, 03:42 PM
Oh yea, when you're stuck in the ruts on #17's fairway, there is no other option than running perpendicular or standing still.

rhett
Apr 24 2007, 04:29 PM
...and you can learn all about uphill runups on the TOBOGGAN COURSE!!!


Been there done that. :)

MikeMC
Apr 24 2007, 04:35 PM
Thanks for the feedback. I'll give these a try. The problem as I see it is that I have a problem getting the proper weight shift when doing a X step up hill. During the last part of the throw, I'm having trouble getting my balance/weight over my pivot foot and never pivot completely around during the release. I end up releasing the disc when my body is still a little left - and of course the disc goes left. Since I never really get all the way around on my pivot foot, holding the disc longer won't help. I'd almost need to jump up onto my pivot foot to get the momentum and power that I typically get. This is only an issue on steeper tee boxes. A minor uphill grade isn't a problem.

I'll try either a 3 step or stand and deliver and live with the lack of distance. A flick shot would work well too - if I had one.

No problem with the disc nose though. The shot is still a line drive and doesn't get air under it. The distance could be better but not a major issue.

DSproAVIAR
Apr 24 2007, 04:45 PM
Thanks for the feedback. I'll give these a try. The problem as I see it is that I have a problem getting the proper weight shift when doing a X step up hill.



Is there room to the right of the tee? If you run-up perpendicular, you won't have to run uphill. You can run-up on level ground (if the tee area makes that possible)

rhett
Apr 24 2007, 07:08 PM
No problem with the disc nose though. The shot is still a line drive and doesn't get air under it. The distance could be better but not a major issue.


So are you saying the issue you are having is with an uphill lie onto a flat fairway?

When you say you have a steep uphill lie, I picture a steep uphill fairway to go with it. A steep uphill fairway requires the nose to be up or else you plow into the hill. :) If you throw up a 30 grade the nose of the disc is "up" even if the disc stays 5 feet off the uphill ground.

Ruder
Apr 25 2007, 04:01 AM
My money drive on an uphill shot is a semi-stable Flash. Throw it on a hyzer almost straight at the basket. Always shows hyzer the whole way but lands on same line it left on.

MikeMC
Apr 25 2007, 10:04 AM
I'm talking about an uphill lie in the tee box and an uphill fairway. Just as I can throw a disc on flat ground with the nose down without it crashing into the ground, I can throw a disc uphill with the nose down. The line is uphill but the nose of the disc is not. My uphill drive with the nose down has an identical flight pattern in relationship to the ground as a throw on flat ground. If the nose is up and the line is up, the drive gets lots of air and flames out - just like on flat ground. I typically throw a nose down, slightly anheiser drive. It goes almost straight with a slight S curve pattern. I go for an angle where both sides of the S are the same distance from a straight line to my target. Accuracy to me is more important than distance. Especially with tight, straight fairways where a heiser flip is not an option.

mtreat
Apr 27 2007, 03:14 PM
A little thread drift. My problem is with fairway shots where my run up is slightly down hill and the target is uphill.

I throw a lot of grounders in that situation. I realize I should compensate, but it doesn't seem to work...

Any ideas will be appreciated...

veganray
Apr 27 2007, 03:17 PM
Stand still & pull slow & s-m-o-o-t-h. I like a beat Gremlin or Leopard for those situations.

willkuper
May 03 2007, 10:54 AM
stand still and throw a less stable disc than you normally would throw for the shot...........with the tee at 45 degrees (????) I dont know how you could possibly attempt any kind of run-up and be very sucessful

if this tee is at your home course I would suggest fixing it somehow (level the tee or move it to a flatter area), 45 degrees is pretty steep for a tee pad.

swampman
May 03 2007, 11:52 PM
I throw backhand most of the time but I started as a forehand thrower. I have gone back to the forehand shot for uphill shots since I don't use much of a run-up I don't have problems with my footing. I've started getting my drives further up the slope and am getting better scores because of it. I dueced a hole the other day that I had always been happy to par before.