TimMirabal
Dec 27 2006, 10:46 PM
I am looking for the best way to practice putting i am a pretty good player but my putting is not where the rest of my game is. what do i do ?

crotts
Dec 27 2006, 11:01 PM
1) get basket
2)get 10 identicle putters(whatever you prefer)
3)putt
4)repeat step 3 forever

: ) :

BoomerFinSooner
Dec 28 2006, 12:41 AM
10 putters :confused: :confused: :confused:

2 is enough

superq16504
Dec 28 2006, 10:11 AM
1 is enough. I see a lot of people practice with 2-5 putters and while it is convienent for repetition, the tendancy is to rapid fire when you have a stack. I have only met one person that putts the way he practices. guy uses 3 discs and alwasy has two discs and a towel in his left hand when he putts (practice and for real) There is something to be said for practicing the way you play. /msgboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Sharky
Dec 28 2006, 10:29 AM
Warming up for a tournament with others around 1 or 2, more than 2 is a courtesy violation

During a session by yourself, 5 to 8 identical putters but do resist the urge to rapid fire the shots, make an effort to treat each putt as a separate shot. Mix it up too. You might start with a concentration on putts around 22 feet. Another strategy is to throw basket to basket with the putters to help hone your up game and to practice a variety of "real world" situation putts.

cornhuskers9495
Dec 28 2006, 02:41 PM
I am looking for the best way to practice putting i am a pretty good player but my putting is not where the rest of my game is. what do i do ?



Putting threads are my favorite. Allow me to share some of my knowledge. I hope ya'll will find it resourceful.

I consider myself a good putter because I have developed a routine that works for me. I do it everytime, same routine

routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine,...

Find a routine..

It truely doesn't matter what putter you use, just use the same mold,

Remember, It's the Archer, not the arrow.

Dave Feldberg gave me a putting lesson a year and a half ago and I watched myself go from 938 to 992 and climbing. Its not my driving that's for sure.

He pointed out a few issues I had ( ie, balance, holding the disc, etc...) and he corrected it all and told me " Practice, Practice, Practice to improve your luck" In which I did, do, and the results will be blatant.

When you putt, or any shot for that matter, you want to develop a easily, repeatable movement or throw. That where practicing and routine come into play.

Good Putting practice:
You will need 3 putters the same and a mini:

- Take 3 putters and disperse them in differnet areas of your putting green within 25-30 feet of the Unit. DO NOT putt from the same spot consecutively.

Address each lie as if you were in a tournament:

Mark your lie, Take your time, focus and visualize the line your putt will take into the chains and release. After you sink that putt move to the next putter. Putt all three, than disperse again.

Real life putting situations:

I like to put each putt in a REAL situations. For instance, I might walk up there and ask if I'm out or say nice drive to the ghost players. I may ask a person to move from behind the basket or to move back. I will address my lie get ready to putt and step away because of a fake car horn or someone shouting of in the distance. Put yourself in real life situations.

My nieghbors probably think i'm crazy cause I'm talking to noone, but I don't care. I'm out living my dream and not trapped behind my TV.

Now after 30 minutes or however long you can remain focused, I take 10 putters from 25 feet from the same spot and make all 10 or I can't go inside until I do. You can maybe start at 15 or 20 feet.

Now, I absolutely LOVE to putt. Well, I always have, but now more find the bottom of the Unit.

I hope you find this resourceful and appliable...

Now go practice!

TanK

bschweberger
Dec 28 2006, 11:00 PM
I use 10 to 20 similar puTTers with 2 baskets 25 to 28 feet apart. less bending over when you have another basket to keep the other puTTers while you are practicing.

bschweberger
Dec 28 2006, 11:35 PM
Franks you are long winded......LOL ;)

cornhuskers9495
Dec 29 2006, 03:53 AM
I prefer too call it informative... :D

bschweberger
Dec 29 2006, 10:37 AM
Yeah yeah, you would

cornhuskers9495
Dec 29 2006, 01:05 PM
Don't you have a tournament to be winning somewhere?

bfunkyp
Dec 29 2006, 01:52 PM
up tah New England, we swear by Pozzy's Putting Game.

Pozzy’s Putting Game

First, a little on the background and concepts about the game. There are a bunch of objectives it accomplishes:

1. Repetitive Motion. Some people have criticized the game because it repeats the same putts over and over, and they prefer to play a game like HORSE, where you move all around, more like a real situation. Both have value for sure, but IMHO, to become a great putter, you first need to train your muscle memory, which involves serious repetition of the exact same motion.

2. Fun. Practice for the most part sucks and is boring. Most of us would rather play rounds. This game is very much a "game" which has a scoring system, so it's not just practice. You set a score, then keep trying to beat it.

3. Competition. In order to simulate the pressure of real tournament putting, this game has an element of competition. First, as you keep score, it becomes you against your best score, much like golfing is you against the course. But because the rules are uniform, you can compete against other people in different locations. For example, Jason, Mike D, and I used to have a competition where we'd say that whoever gets the highest putting game score when we meet at the next tourney wins and gets some cash or whatever. So for the few weeks before the tourney, I'm competing against Jason and Mike whenever I practice, and that definitely ups the pressure on my putts.

4. Don't over-shoot the pin. One of the worst things you can do while putting is to blow by the basket and miss your comeback putt. This game punishes you HARD for doing that.

5. Consistency. There are huge rewards for hitting all your putts, encouraging consistency.


So here are the rules to Pozzy's Putting Game:

First, you need 10 putters, preferrably identical to your every day putter. Having less means you have to keep picking them up, which gets boring. Throwing 10 in a row keeps it fun and lets you work on the muscle memory.

Mark out 5 spots in a straight line from the pole hole, at 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 feet. If 10 footers are a complete joke, then move it to 15, as we did after a couple months of playing. That in itself was proof of how well the game worked, as when we started it was hard to get all 10 in from 10 feet, and after a while it was impossible to miss one.

So once you have your game set up, bring the 10 putters to the 10 foot line. I'd suggest putting a chair or table beside you, so you can quickly grab them without bending down to the ground every time.

You shoot all 10 from 10 feet. Since there is no excuse for missing a 10 footer EVER, the only way you score is by getting all 10 in. If you get all 10, then you get 10 points. But if you miss, you LOSE 10 points for every one you miss. Harsh, because there is no excuse for ever missing a 10 footer.

This next part involves what to do when you miss. The same rules apply to putts missed from all distances:

Take all of your misses to whichever miss was farthest from the pin. If you missed more than 1, you're gonna pay by shooting the longest possible putts. When you shoot these back, you have to get them all in. If you get them all in, you don't get any more points. Why would you get rewarded for saving a putt you should have made in the first place? But if you MISS your comeback putts? You get screwed, and screwed hard, because missing a comeback putt is about as bad as it gets. So for every one you miss, you lose DOUBLE what that putt was originally worth. And if you then miss any of those putts, you lose DOUBLE what it just was.

In other words, don't miss those recovery putts, ever!

So all your discs are in. Now take all 10 to the 20' mark. These are all worth 1 point each. If you miss any of these (or any from longer distances) you don't LOSE any points, because you're no longer in the absolute gimme range. However, we still want to reward consistency, so if you hit all 10 of them, you get double points. So you get 9 points for 9, or 20 points for 10. As with the others, take all the misses to the farthest point and shoot them back. If you miss any, you lose 2 points for each miss. You then take those all to the farthest miss, and lose 4 points if you miss any. If you miss a 3rd time, just give up disc golf.

Now shoot 10 from 30 feet. These are woth 2 points each, so you could get 40 if you hit all 10. All the other rules are the same.

Then 10 from 40', worth 5 points each.

10 from 50', all worth 10 points.


I think the highest score I ever got was mid 80's, lowest was like -60 or something. I'd be curious what the all-time record is by now.


One round of this game takes about 15 minutes or so if I recall correctly. If you factor in missing maybe 10 or so per round, you throw about 60 or more putts per round. Play 4 rounds in one hour and you just threw 250 or more putts.

Oh, I forgot the most important rule. You can't quit in the middle of a round. If you do, you have to stop for the day. This is because once you get good, you may get like 60 points or something. Then in the next round, you miss one of your 10 footers, and then miss the comeback, and you're -20 and you know there's no chance in hell you'll beat 60. So the urge is to quit and start over. NO DICE. Finish the round and practice ALL your putts, or go home and watch tv because you're a quitting loser.


I really can't tell you how much this can help your putting game if you play it a bunch, especially for newer players who still don't have a solid, repetitive putting style down. It forces you to have one, and trains the muscles to do it over and over.

MikeMC
Jan 03 2007, 02:53 PM
I'm well into practicing my putting and have some feedback to consider.

The most important change I made to my putting practice was to focus on my technique. My goal is to execute my putting technique exactly the same every putt. I used to focus on making putts. It may sound subtle but it is making a big difference. I am much more aware of my body and motion now that I focus on technique. My goals are now based on consistant technique. I record how many I make and it is improving but I don't really care so much about that as consistant technique. Making a putt that I can't reproduce is irrelevant to getting better. I count my performance for both technique and making the putt. If I shift my hips, lose balance or otherwise screw up my technique but the disc goes in, I record it as a technique miss. This has proven to be much more difficult as your body is different during each practice session and fatigue can play a factor.

Develop a training schedule and dedicate time to a variety of putting. I practice from 15', 25' and 50'. I also practice heiser, straight and anheiser. I put more focus on areas I'm trying to improve. I may do 3 sets of 10 putts for my 15" but 10 sets of 10 putts from 50'. I do either 60 or 90 minute practice sessions that are very focused and all business.

Set goals to acheive like to make an average 25% of 50' putts after 30 days of practice. What the goals are is not real important as much as having something that helps focuse you.

I do use 10 of the same discs and weight because I want to reduce the time spent retreiving discs. I place the discs on a small table so I do not need to keep bending over because it bothers my back. To avoid the rapid fire issue, I use a marker and lace the table with my discs 6 feet or so behind the marker. This forces me to step away from the marker and then re-set for each throw.

That's what is working for me. I'm very close to 100% from 25', 36% from 50' and 12% from 75'.

Koronin
Jan 03 2007, 03:23 PM
When you go play a casual round, take 10-15 minutes to practice putting before you play the round. That's helped me a lot the last few weeks.

Ideally, you'd want to get yourself a basket (Nstep dg100 is good if you're on a tight budget) a few putters and just keep at it and keep it interesting.

the_kid
Jan 03 2007, 09:24 PM
I am looking for the best way to practice putting i am a pretty good player but my putting is not where the rest of my game is. what do i do ?



Putting threads are my favorite. Allow me to share some of my knowledge. I hope ya'll will find it resourceful.

I consider myself a good putter because I have developed a routine that works for me. I do it everytime, same routine

routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine, routine,...

Find a routine..

It truely doesn't matter what putter you use, just use the same mold,

Remember, It's the Archer, not the arrow.

Dave Feldberg gave me a putting lesson a year and a half ago and I watched myself go from 938 to 992 and climbing. Its not my driving that's for sure.

He pointed out a few issues I had ( ie, balance, holding the disc, etc...) and he corrected it all and told me " Practice, Practice, Practice to improve your luck" In which I did, do, and the results will be blatant.

When you putt, or any shot for that matter, you want to develop a easily, repeatable movement or throw. That where practicing and routine come into play.

Good Putting practice:
You will need 3 putters the same and a mini:

- Take 3 putters and disperse them in differnet areas of your putting green within 25-30 feet of the Unit. DO NOT putt from the same spot consecutively.

Address each lie as if you were in a tournament:

Mark your lie, Take your time, focus and visualize the line your putt will take into the chains and release. After you sink that putt move to the next putter. Putt all three, than disperse again.

Real life putting situations:

I like to put each putt in a REAL situations. For instance, I might walk up there and ask if I'm out or say nice drive to the ghost players. I may ask a person to move from behind the basket or to move back. I will address my lie get ready to putt and step away because of a fake car horn or someone shouting of in the distance. Put yourself in real life situations.

My nieghbors probably think i'm crazy cause I'm talking to noone, but I don't care. I'm out living my dream and not trapped behind my TV.

Now after 30 minutes or however long you can remain focused, I take 10 putters from 25 feet from the same spot and make all 10 or I can't go inside until I do. You can maybe start at 15 or 20 feet.

Now, I absolutely LOVE to putt. Well, I always have, but now more find the bottom of the Unit.

I hope you find this resourceful and appliable...

Now go practice!

TanK




You must also be puffing on a fresh Black n' Mild. :D

ChrisWoj
Jan 04 2007, 12:20 AM
I've been in a thousand real life situations. I know how they feel. All that is important to me right now is getting a robot-like reliable putting stroke. Find that arm slot that I can hit every time with ridiculous consistency. Thats what I need more than anything. I know how to get myself into the proper mental state to take a putt. I know how to address each lie.

mistuhmiles
Jan 04 2007, 01:47 PM
i practice putting from 10' to 35'. i throw 20 putts from each point. my points vary depending on how much time i have to practice. i keep track on how many i have made from each point and get a average for the week from each point. after that i'll pick a spot about 100' away and throw upshots to the basket using different lines. then i go putt those lies. move it back 30 - 50' and repeat.

ChrisWoj
Jan 05 2007, 10:41 PM
What percentage of 20 footers do you think that the top pros would make in practice in a controlled situation, minimal/no wind, open run at the basket. Just curious... Today had a run where I started at 80% after 25 putts, was up to 86% at 100 putts... and since I was on a 21-straight run at 100 I kept going another 22 until I missed... (yes I'm bragging, its the most I think I remember hitting from that range) oh and I had multiple putters, I set them about 10 feet away so between putts I walked to get one and re-set.

I'm curious would the pros be hitting like 95%? 98%? 99%?

the_kid
Jan 06 2007, 03:24 PM
Most top Pros would be like 95%. Barry on the other hand would be like 75%. :D

ChrisWoj
Jan 06 2007, 10:43 PM
Gotcha... I managed to up it by a whole 1% today haha... I hope I can get myself hitting 93%+ every time by the time winter ends... doing this every day. I want to be ready for BG Ams... I want to be the best out of the SE Mich/NW Ohio area there...

z Vaughn z
Jan 07 2007, 06:15 PM
Gotcha... I managed to up it by a whole 1% today haha... I hope I can get myself hitting 93%+ every time by the time winter ends... doing this every day. I want to be ready for BG Ams... I want to be the best out of the SE Mich/NW Ohio area there...



I feel I could have some wisdom for this thread. After all, I was 2nd place in the 2006 Am Worlds putting competition. My friend Jeff took 1st and guess what, we practice together all the time.
I don't think there is any one secret to putting. I have gone through 5 putters the last 2 years and about 20 different putting styles. I have found that I'm at my best when putting everyday...practice works.
Jeff and I practiced all winter in his basement. We could get up to 28 footers down there which is great practice. There is tape marked out on the floor, and I like to putt 20-50 or more from each line. I do straddles, knee, sidearm now and then just to mix it up from my normal routine. Don't get frusterated when you are having a bad day of putting, the negative mentality will not help.
This year I plan to get a little better with a routine for putting, and driving/approach.
Practice is essential to putting, the more you do, the better you will become. If you want to do well at BG, practice putting close to everyday and trust yourself when you step up to that 29 footer on hole 2 at Hobson.

ChrisWoj
Jan 08 2007, 11:15 PM
Gotcha... I managed to up it by a whole 1% today haha... I hope I can get myself hitting 93%+ every time by the time winter ends... doing this every day. I want to be ready for BG Ams... I want to be the best out of the SE Mich/NW Ohio area there...



I feel I could have some wisdom for this thread. After all, I was 2nd place in the 2006 Am Worlds putting competition. My friend Jeff took 1st and guess what, we practice together all the time.
I don't think there is any one secret to putting. I have gone through 5 putters the last 2 years and about 20 different putting styles. I have found that I'm at my best when putting everyday...practice works.
Jeff and I practiced all winter in his basement. We could get up to 28 footers down there which is great practice. There is tape marked out on the floor, and I like to putt 20-50 or more from each line. I do straddles, knee, sidearm now and then just to mix it up from my normal routine. Don't get frusterated when you are having a bad day of putting, the negative mentality will not help.
This year I plan to get a little better with a routine for putting, and driving/approach.
Practice is essential to putting, the more you do, the better you will become. If you want to do well at BG, practice putting close to everyday and trust yourself when you step up to that 29 footer on hole 2 at Hobson.


A friend and myself have decided to try to play Pozzy's Putting Game every other day and I'm going to do my 100 20-footers routine daily...

The practice showed yesterday at Hudson Mills: I felt like I played absolutely TERRIBLE and still managed to average 930+ rated rounds, usually when I feel like I played horrid I end up averaging 900-910. I can't say it made me play a spectacular round, but it really has brought up my game a noticable pair of strokes or so per round. And thats just a week of practice total.


-Chris.

coop123
Jan 09 2007, 12:12 AM
I think that everyone on this list is sort of right. I am not a great putter, but here's my take.

The people that putt with many putters from the same spot are using a good strategy to develop muscle memory for short and long putts.

The people that use only a couple of putters are instilling that each putt is important.

In my opinion it is best to use about five putters and putt from different places and distances. A good way to establish these random lies is to approach with all 5 between 2 baskets about 200' apart. This not only recreates a realistic situation, but you also develop your driving with putters.

Also, I have found that focusing on the basket for 5-10 seconds, then closing your eyes and putting makes you focus on the mental part of putting. That is really the most important part. If you ask any pro if putting is physical or mental they will all tell you that it is all mental.

See you at the next tournament when you are the only person plaing juniors Tim!!!

TimMirabal
Jan 09 2007, 01:15 AM
Thanks for all the help everyone,

and coop just to let you know im done with juniors except for am worlds this summer.

Innova19
Jan 17 2007, 12:20 AM
I THINK ITS BEST TO CARRY MORE THAT ONE TYPE OF PUTTER. IF YOU LIKE HARD PUTTERS LIKE WIZZARDS TRY PUTTING WITH A SOFTER GRIP PUTTER FOR MEDIUM RANGE PUTTS LIKE AVIAR X. VISE / VERSE IF YOU LIKE SOFT PUTTERS. MY CHOICE OF PUTTER IS THE ARROW BY AROBIE. WHEN YOU GET USED TO IT THEY WILL SAVE YOU A LOT OF STROKES. YOU CAN'T OVER THROW THEM.

Gregg
Jan 21 2007, 03:08 AM
I'M THE BEST PUTTER HAHAHAHAA!

cornhuskers9495
Jan 21 2007, 04:21 AM
"Be humble or Crumble"

Gregg
Jan 25 2007, 03:54 AM
i do belive I was humbled at us Championships in the dark...??? (at the hotel)
lol, good times. and being humble doesn't work 4 me, people theink I'm an ***** h0le anyways...lol. but thats cuz they don't know me either.

Gregg
Jan 25 2007, 04:00 AM
"Be humble or Crumble"


I was also joking, because anyone that has seen josh anthon or steve rico knows what great putter looks like...

cornhuskers9495
Jan 25 2007, 09:55 AM
I don't think your and #$*&$!hole Barsby, I rather enjoyed hangin out with you @ the Open and puttin til 2 am everynight...

I just think your misunderstood... ;)

the_beastmaster
Jan 26 2007, 01:20 PM
You must also be puffing on a fresh Black n' Mild. :D



That's how I putt! :o:D In practice and on the course.

Bizzle
Jan 26 2007, 01:45 PM
I wouldn't reccommend using more than a couple of identical putters for practice, that way each shot is more important...If you use a crap load of putters, its no big deal if you miss......Anyway, just my 2 cents.

cornhuskers9495
Jan 26 2007, 03:50 PM
You must also be puffing on a fresh Black n' Mild. :D



Always, you know how I roll!

Gregg
Jan 27 2007, 02:44 AM
Off the course, when I putt at home or somthing, I don't try new "techniques" or anything like that. I hammer those out at the practice green at the course, when I putt at home I work on the muscle memory of my putt, so its not a huge deal to practice something new at home...

IDK when I'm at the course, I have my different style of putting that I "made" there... this may be very confusing and backwards to a lot of people thats just how I do it.

superq16504
Jan 30 2007, 01:31 PM
Off the course, when I putt at home or somthing, I don't try new "techniques" or anything like that. I hammer those out at the practice green at the course, when I putt at home I work on the muscle memory of my putt, so its not a huge deal to practice something new at home...



IDK when I'm at the course, I have my different style of putting that I "made" there... this may be very confusing and backwards to a lot of people thats just how I do it.




I could not have said that better... for me the difference is that my home basket catches and the junk that we have to play on at the course does not catch like a normal approved target.

z Vaughn z
Feb 05 2007, 12:11 AM
Another tip......learn to putt with a putter that has some drop to it. Wizards and rhynos come to mind as the tend to drop at the end of their flight. Wizards are the cross between aviars and rhynos a perfect blend for most...given wind, you can't beat a rhyno.
When you learn the drop of a putter, you learn a proper and complete realease of the disc. This is something that a floating putter doesn't teach you..aka, 86 softie, aviar, magnet.
But everyone has their own preference....this is my take.
Lessons from the Z.....

swampman
May 04 2007, 12:29 AM
I think the best way to practice putting is to try a variety of different methods. Some days I throw the same shot repeatedly sometimes I throw a couple shots then move onto a completely different shot or change up my style. If you vary it from day to day it keeps it more interesting and ecourages you to keep practicing. I have hit 93% from 30' to win a bet ( only had to hit 80% to win) and when I get in the groove I can make 50' putts fairly consistantly. When it is all said and done all the time I put in practice putting has made for lower scores and allows me to be competitive with much longer drivers than me.

"The drive is for show & the putt is for dough."

mikeP
May 04 2007, 02:00 PM
Another tip......learn to putt with a putter that has some drop to it. Wizards and rhynos come to mind as the tend to drop at the end of their flight. Wizards are the cross between aviars and rhynos a perfect blend for most...given wind, you can't beat a rhyno.
When you learn the drop of a putter, you learn a proper and complete realease of the disc. This is something that a floating putter doesn't teach you..aka, 86 softie, aviar, magnet.
But everyone has their own preference....this is my take.
Lessons from the Z.....



This is a very good point. I've used Wizards, KC Aviars, and now the Banger GT, all fine drop-putters. The downside to this approach is that you will have days where you are hitting the top of the basket a lot, but you never have to worry about the comeback putt.

Alacrity
May 04 2007, 03:06 PM
I would have to agree with the below advice. I have 9 and I am still looking for the 10th putter now. I practice 30 to 45 minutes a day about 3 times a week. My regimen,

- Start with 15 foot putts and make a minimum of 10 putts in a row. This establishes the muscle memory and when I am playing I never worry about 25 foot putts or less because of the practice. I have talked to many people who fear a 15 foot putt, because the don't practice them enough. By the way, don't just focus on long putts, you need to master short and long.
- My second station is about 22 feet away. Once again I must make a minimum of 10 putts in a row to move on.
- Third station is about 30 feet and once again I make 10 in a row to progress. I then have stations at 40, 50 and 60 foot that I also practice and generally must hit the majority of the 9 to move on.

After I have made a minimum of 100 putts, not thrown, but made, I start to practice variations such as side arm putts and stradle putts. I don't ordinarily straddle, but on the course you must.

I know several people don't like repetitive putts as I outline above, but by doing this I really enforce the muscle memory. Once you have that down you are not focusing on the elementary stuff on the course, but where to aim for in the basket based on wind, elevation, and distance. I have three baskets in the backyard now and also practice uphill and downhill putts. It is amazing how little fear I have of downhill putts when I know that I am going to hit the basket.



1) get basket
2)get 10 identicle putters(whatever you prefer)
3)putt
4)repeat step 3 forever

: ) :

Qwikstreet
May 29 2008, 07:46 AM
I started practicing my putts a lot in my backyard last year. (I haven't started this year yet.) What I was doing was taking one of those climbing carabineers and attaching a string of 60 feet with every ten feet marked off with electrical tape. I attached the carabineer to the bottom pole and could practice distances from different lies, elevation, obstacles (swingset), wind, and sun. I saw a big difference in my accuracy on the course.

I still have a problem with putting with people watching me. Luckily, I have a major softball stadium across the alley from me and try to practice during big games. This way the spectators start gazing into my yard. I can see them watching me and just need to learn to block them out more. (I should really start putting at work so I can have a more tuned in crowd of people I know who will surely starting talking or asking questions.)

But now when I'm putting on the course I start picturing my backyard and visualizing that this putt is only from my grill, through the swings, and into the basket.

tiltedhalo
May 29 2008, 06:03 PM
As a city dweller, I just moved into a townhouse with a basement, and I've been working on a modified version of the Pozzy Putting Game for smaller spaces. I have a small backyard and no good putting parks nearby, so the basement is my best bet for improving my rounds.

I am fairly sure that my 960s-rating comes from something like being a 920-rated putter, a 950-rated driver, and a 1020-rated recovery-shot taker after I kick off into the rough. I don't expect my drives to ever get to 1000-rated range -- I just don't have the arm for it -- but I think everyone has the potential to be a 1000-rated putter if they practice (I've just never practiced).

Anyway, for others who might be in similar, confined spaces, I thought I would share my miniaturized version of the Pozzy Putting Game, in case anyone else wants to compete.

My max range in the basement is 35' feet, so I've got tape at 15', 20', 25', 30' and 35'. It's got a six-foot ceiling, so it's going to force me to run the basket -- no loft putting practice for me. Also, because it is enclosed, there is no real way to practice comeback putts or roll-aways, since discs will always hit the wall behind the basket. So I have to eliminate the Pozzy penalties for comeback putts.

I decided to make it a game of percentages -- pick the percentage that I think I should hit at each distance, and penalize the score for each missed shot outside that number (use 10 putters at each distance to make it easy to track). Because every missed putt costs one stroke. I don't think penalties should be higher for missing a 15' putt than for a 30' putt -- they are worth the same on the course -- but you should be held to a higher percentage expectation the closer you are to the basket.

For me, at my current putting level, I'm setting the baseline at the following levels for each distance:

15' - 100% (each missed shot is -5 points)
20' - 80% (each miss less than 8/10 is -5 points; each putt above 8/10 is positive 2 points, double round points (to a total of 8) if you make all 10 putts)
25' - 50% (each miss less than 5/10 is -5 points; each putt above 5/10 is positive 3 points, double round points (to a total of 30) if you make all 10 putts)
30' - 20% (each miss less than 2/10 is -5 points; each putt above 2/10 is positive 4 points; double points (to a total of 64) if you make all 10 putts)
35' - 0% (you don't have to make any of these putts; every putt you make is worth 5 points; double points (to a total of 100) if you make all 10 putts)

So if you make all 50 putts, you get a total of 0+8+30+64+100: 202. Which seems like a good name for this variation: "Putting 202"-- sounds like a sophomore college course, which is basically what my putting needs.

A benefit I see to this way of scoring is that it places emphasis on at least hitting your percentages at each distance. And if you come in below your percentages, you really have to shoot well to make up for it at the greater distances. The reason that 35' out is worth 5 points is that -- at least for me -- anything I hit at 35' feels like a gift, and feels like it "makes up for" a missed putt somewhere else in the round. So this scoring system is close to how I feel scoring "feels" out on the course. To score ANY positive points, I have to exceed my minimum percentages.

Another benefit is that if you are playing with friends, it makes it easy to handicap players of different skill levels -- just raise or lower the required percentages for each distance. (If you're playing with a new player who isn't expected to hit all 10 from 15', use 1 point to score discs above the target %).

Obviously, based on some of the posts above, this putting regimen would be a joke to some folks who are already hitting high percentages at greater distances than 35' -- for me, however, I worked out the details for this game yesterday, and in five rounds, my cumulative score was negative, so I've got some work to do.

I plan to try these rules and percentages for a few weeks; my goal is to get to where I can score 50+ consistently; I think anything over 100 is a ridiculously good score. I think moving from sub-zero to +50 would add at least 25 points to my PDGA rating if I could match that performance on the course.

The last rule I steal directly from the original Pozzy game -- if you don't finish the game you started, you have to quit for the day; no bailing out just because you start out poorly. Push through and fight to recover -- just like a real round. I think this definitely helps the mental game.

If anyone wants to try 202 and post scores for me to shoot for, go for it. I plan to track some rounds and post the results as an exercise in self-humiliation.

junky
May 29 2008, 07:28 PM
I would say "positive pressure", not self-humiliation.

ChrisWoj
Jun 03 2008, 12:55 PM
Its been well over a year since I last posted in this thread. :P Ha. The putting in the house thing helped me out a little bit at the time, but the biggest thing for me in the past year (which has seen my rating go from 913 to 961, if that says anything other than that I have no life) has been the following routine:

1. Set up your basket at one end of a park.
2. Throw big hyzers out away from it, just bomb them up in the air and as far out as, say, 330-340 with all of your drivers. Throw straight shots out with Mids/Putters.
3. Throw your mids/putters back to the basket as up shots, backhand or forehand whichever is the better throw for the lie.
4. Throw your drivers back to the basket forehand, every one of them (yes, even the roadrunners/sidewinders/flippy stuff).
5. Putt with your putters from every single lie you've given yourself.
6. Take every comebacker as a straddle putt.

My forehand has improved by leaps and bounds, my putting is far more consistent than it ever was, and my backhand builds strength as I bomb hyzers up into the air.

pnkgtr
Jun 03 2008, 04:47 PM
Good job! I will no longer berate you for making suggestions because of your low player rating. 961 is a respectable rating and you did exactly what you needed to show improvement. What many players don't realize is that it's possible to learn a shot or a disc in an hour of practice that could take a year only playing rounds. And since you're young your player rating will continue to go up but the rate of increase will slow so don't get frustrated.

ChrisWoj
Jun 03 2008, 07:17 PM
Good job! I will no longer berate you for making suggestions because of your low player rating. 961 is a respectable rating and you did exactly what you needed to show improvement. What many players don't realize is that it's possible to learn a shot or a disc in an hour of practice that could take a year only playing rounds. And since you're young your player rating will continue to go up but the rate of increase will slow so don't get frustrated.


I disagree. ;) Your rating is about where I consider one to begin getting "respectable", 980+. To me the difference between myself and yourself is I'm getting to be too good to play amateur anymore (dealing with people saying "get out of my division" even if they're joking is frustrating) but it isn't good enough to do more than win your money back every once in a while in Open.

But thanks for saying you won't berate me anymore. :) I wasn't aware you were before ;) Maybe its because so many people do! Haha

Qwikstreet
Jun 04 2008, 07:34 AM
For me, at my current putting level, I'm setting the baseline at the following levels for each distance:

15' - 100% (each missed shot is -5 points)
20' - 80% (each miss less than 8/10 is -5 points; each putt above 8/10 is positive 2 points, double round points (to a total of 8) if you make all 10 putts)
25' - 50% (each miss less than 5/10 is -5 points; each putt above 5/10 is positive 3 points, double round points (to a total of 30) if you make all 10 putts)
30' - 20% (each miss less than 2/10 is -5 points; each putt above 2/10 is positive 4 points; double points (to a total of 64) if you make all 10 putts)
35' - 0% (you don't have to make any of these putts; every putt you make is worth 5 points; double points (to a total of 100) if you make all 10 putts)

So if you make all 50 putts, you get a total of 0+8+30+64+100: 202. Which seems like a good name for this variation: "Putting 202"-- sounds like a sophomore college course, which is basically what my putting needs.




I like that idea of making it a game with set goals for points. I'm going to have to try this. Thank you.