Main Menu

Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer

Story and photos courtesy of USDGC.com.

Despite a soggy Saturday Morning in Rock Hill, S.C., a strong showing of 25 ladies shrugged off the rain to take part in the 2015 Throw Pink Event at Fewell Park in Rock Hill, S.C.

The all-female event began last year and is designed to be a relaxing, comfortable way for women and girls to get a first crack at disc golf, all while helping put an end to breast cancer via Throw Pink.

Story courtesy of USDGC.com. Photo credit: Throw Pink on Facebook.

After a successful inaugural event last year, Throw Pink returns to Rock Hill, S.C., where women and girls can learn disc golf while helping put an end to breast cancer.

Join the PDGA in the fight to end breast cancer! For the 3rd year in a row, the PDGA will be donating $2 to the Young Survival Coalition for every female player that competes in a PDGA-sanctioned event during the month of October.

The PDGA is continuing its initiative this year to increase women’s participation in disc golf events while raising money for an extremely important cause, the fight against breast cancer. During the month of October, the PDGA pledges to donate two dollars to the Young Survival Coalition for every female that plays in a PDGA sanctioned event.

The month of October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the United States, and to honor this, Prodigy Disc and the PDGA partnered up in 2013 in a fundraising effort to help fight this dreaded disease that affects the lives of so many. 

In 2013, there were approximately 232,000 new cases of breast cancer and almost 40,000 deaths. The chance of a woman having breast cancer in her life is about one in eight.  Breast cancer is treatable when detected early.  The best method of detection is through self-exams. Awareness through education and promotions is the key to more women learning how and why to do self-exams.  

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Prodigy Disc is proud to partner with the PDGA in a fundraising effort to help fight this dreaded disease that affects the lives of so many.

In 2013, there were approximately 232,000 new cases of breast cancer and almost 40,000 deaths. The chance of a woman having breast cancer in her life is about one in eight.  Breast cancer is treatable when detected early.  The best method of detection is through self-exams. Awareness through education and promotions is the key to more women learning how and why to do self-exams.